At the end of the day, consumers want to feel like they’re always interacting with something natural and real. Like most SEO professionals, nothing wrecks my digestive system more than an organic traffic drop with no apparent reason. Google now indexes content from Facebook, Twitter and presumably more social media platforms to come. If your timing and relevance is right, your post could directly show up in search results. It doesn’t matter how many searches a keyword has in a month if it doesn’t accurately reflect the content on your page!

See what keywords you already rank for

A great way to boost your site’s search visibility is to have a blog. Search engines are constantly scanning for content that is well-written, original, relevant and up-to-date and a blog post can tick all these boxes. Whether or not a specific page ranks for a particular keyword depends largely on the quality of that individual page (content, user experience, number and quality of the backlinks, page load speed etc), and not the quality of your website as a whole. The initial purpose of search engines counting the quantity and quality of links linking back to any webpage was to ensure that only those pages providing valuable and trustworthy content to their users would be ranked higher than less credible resources in search results pages. Always remember to find natural local keywords. Simply stuffing in unnecessary mentions of the residing town may actually do your SEO more harm than good.

SEO can be a frustrating activity

To maintain a healthy website, do an overall audit of your underperforming blog content or articles to determine what to keep, what to make more robust, and what to remove. Honestly, I wouldn’t suggest moving so quickly that you risk some type of penalty. Particularly with backlinking, if your ‘velocity’ or the time passing and frequency of links procured rises too fast – it will look fishy and unnatural. . Search engine optimization applied correctly will create better visibility online, but it's just one part of your overall marketing strategy. Links aren’t just for navigation; they are also a tool for guiding potential customers through the marketing funnel.

Use more than one search engine

Domain Authority is a score (on a 100-point scale) developed by Moz that predicts how well a website will rank on search engines. We like to use Domain Authority when comparing one site to another or tracking the “strength” of your website over time. When it comes to getting your content to the top of the search rankings there’s a number of methods you can employ. But if there’s one constant that runs through them all then that would be the importance of keywords. Prove that you are trustworthy by connecting as closely as possible to high authority sites. Use structured data to further explain your topics. We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, for his thoughts on the matter: "There are issues like helping Google understand the content on your pages and website, incoming links, page authority, domain authority, usage patterns, spam factors, canonical issues and much more."

Good content + bad design = failure

The search engines analyze the reading level of the web page. One popular formula for doing this is the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Readability Formula, which considers things like the average word length and the number of words in a sentence to determine the level of education needed to be able to understand the sentence. Google’s featured snippet is a tool through which Google interacts with searchers. The more inputs Google receives from searchers, the better becomes its understanding of what they want. Don’t try and stuff keywords where they don’t belong. Yes, still focus on keywords, but your north star for everything you write should be the user. Backlinks are a vote of confidence that someone outside of your own web property trusts your content and believes it has value. Google weighs up each of these links and assigns the linked-to webpage its own value.