Creating Local resources offers a plethora of link building opportunities. It is also an easy option for those businesses that don’t have a strong local presence or haven’t interacted much locally. Creating these resources is relatively easy but extreme care should be taken that only well-researched content goes into them. Creating content on a consistent basis not only builds links internally (by linking out from your posts), but also gives you the ability to naturally attract links to your content. A blog is essential to many strategies I list below, such as linking out. You can use your blog as an informal platform for giving insights into your thought process as it relates to your business. You can review products, offer personal opinions (be careful, of course, to avoid serious controversy) and answer questions. Even if your blog readers aren’t ready to purchase your products or services, they’ll be more likely to turn to you when they are. Sometimes, your site will need some downtime, so you can fix things or update plugins. Most of the time, this tends to be a relatively short period in which Google will most likely not attempt to crawl your website.

Landing page and site user experience

By creating great relevant content with the right keywords​ and having a few decent backlinks built to those content pages, you can easily rank in Google depending on the competition for that particular search. Competition with a comparable piece of content will beat you in the rankings if they have a better link profile and vice versa. For sites “with just a few things to mark up,” Google also offers a tool within Search Console that allows a site owner to quickly click-and-drag to apply structured data. Experience-based competitive audits analyze variables that would affect the experience someone has on your website compared to that of your competitors. Limit each paragraph to 2-3 sentences at most. It’s even okay to use one-sentence paragraphs if necessary, but use them sparingly or your post will look like a bullet-pointed blog without the bullets.

Use discretion with hashtags

Technical SEO is work improving the non-content parts of your website. These tend to be the elements behind the scenes that visitors don’t see (but often affect their experience of the website!) If you’re not able to rank on the first page, try to write another article, focused on a (even) more long tail keyword. Make it a little bit more specific, more niche. And see how that goes. Ideally, if you’re running your own small business, doing your own writing establishes you as the authority. Everyone likes to deal with the owner, and this provides a way to establish many relationships with customers simply through generating your own content. The truth is that working on the search optimisation for your website is not a guaranteed source of traffic.

Choose a host with an excellent uptime track record

Most of your link authority is on your homepage, right? So, it makes sense that the more clicks away from your homepage a product page gets, the less authority it has. Once the Search Engines crawls the web and comes across the new pages, it then indexes or stores the information in its giant database categorically, to be retrieved later when any search query related to it comes up. These giant database storage facilities is capable of processing large amount of information really quickly. There are many subtle nuances to the mechanics of semantic search, but ultimately what it means for you is that an authoritative page that dives into one specific topic in-depth will usually rank better than dozens of pages built around different keywords. We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, for his thoughts on the matter: "SEO-friendly content writing is not just about pandering to your audience with content that is splattered with keywords."

Start by identifying your core set of target keywords

Any link to another part of the same site is called an internal link. As well as links you'd expect to find (within a site menu bar, for example) you can also create internal links by linking to past posts within newer ones. In order for backlink checkers to exist, the entire web (i.e. billions of pages) has to be crawled, regularly re-crawled and stored in a monstrous database. The costs and challenges associated with doing this are HUGE. Link reclamation can help you get fresh links by finding broken links to your site and having the publisher fix them. Whether you should go after long tail keywords, which are specific and consist of multiple words, or after head terms largely depends on your competition.